Programme

Ottawa 2019

1 October 2019

WORKSHOP - Advocating with Skill

Speakers: Francois Lagarde

Advocating with Skill

Session Facilitators: François Lagarde, Ariane Cyr, Fannie Dagenais 

Session content overview:

Most social marketing initiatives involve communicating with decision-makers to advocate the adoption of policies or measures aimed at creating supportive environments for behavioural change or addressing the root causes of a given social issue. Developing advocacy skills is essential for anyone who wants to successfully influence elected and senior officials in governments and municipalities or other public, non-profit and private sector organizations. This three-hour workshop will provide practical tools in both English and French. Participants will work through a series of concrete questions designed to help them effectively plan, deliver and evaluate advocacy strategies, as well as improve their range of professional skills and their organizational capacity. During the workshop, we will present our Rallying tool (Pour rallier), which was developed during a two-year process that involved thousands of locally-based practitioners and leaders in Quebec (Canada) and included a comprehensive survey of their advocacy-related needs. Topline results of the survey will be shared at this workshop. We will also present two case studies from the local and provincial levels, one specifically based on Quebec’s Early Childhood Observatory. 

WORKSHOP - Fostering Sustainable and Healthy Behaviour through Community-Based Social Marketing

Fostering Sustainable and Healthy Behaviour through Community-Based Social Marketing

Session Facilitator: Dr Doug McKenzie-Mohr

Session content overview:

This one-day workshop with Dr Doug McKenzie-Mohr, internationally renowned social marketer and founder of community-based social marketing, provides a comprehensive introduction to community-based social marketing and how it is being applied throughout the world to foster sustainable and healthy behaviour. Those who attend the workshop will learn the five steps of community-based social marketing (selecting behaviours, identifying barriers, developing strategies, conducting pilots, and broad scale implementation) and be exposed to numerous case studies illustrating its use. As such, this workshop provides an in-depth exposure to community-based social marketing and provides participants with the knowledge they need to develop their own programmes.

Full day workshop: GBP 240.00

Dr. Doug McKenzie-Mohr, CBSM

Dr. Doug McKenzie-Mohr

For over three decades Dr. McKenzie-Mohr has been working to incorporate scientific knowledge on behaviour change into the design and delivery of community programs. He is the founder of community-based social marketing and the author of three books on the topic. One of these books, “Fostering Sustainable Behavior: An Introduction to Community-Based Social Marketing,” has been recommended by Time Magazine and become requisite reading for those who deliver programs to promote sustainable and healthy behaviour. He has delivered workshops internationally for over 70,000 program managers.

Here are some recent, anonymous evaluations:

"Fantastic. Simply invaluable”

“A fabulous workshop”

“By far, the best workshop I’ve attended — on any topic!!!”

“Masterful”

“Enormously beneficial”

“Highest quality training I have ever had the fortune to be part of”

“A life-changing event”

“Completely transformed my approach to my work”.

WORKSHOP - Keeping Causes Relevant During Changing Times

Keeping Your Causes Relevant During Changing Times

Session Facilitators: Brooke Tully

Session content overview:

People’s expectations of organizations they interact with and support are changing rapidly, and the bar is being set higher than ever. Today, people expect organizations, institutions, corporations and governments to be:

  • Transparent and trustworthy;
  • Authentic in their communication;
  • Empathetic to their experiences; and
  • Super easy to interact with.

That’s a lot!

If you’re responsible for reaching out and engaging members, volunteers, donors, communities, and supporters for your cause. Or if you design and deliver unique experiences for these audiences. Or if you’re starting a new social change project or organization. Or – more likely – you do all of these things, then these are expectations you can’t afford to ignore.

These shifts impact the methods we use to engage audiences, build trust, and motivate them to take action. This workshop explains why these shifts are happening and how it impacts social change efforts, while also highlighting opportunities to meet (or even lead) these rising expectations.

In this full-day workshop, we will explore different options for meeting expectations with the aim of identifying realistic and achievable ways your program can stay ahead. You’ll leave the workshop with a set of ideas that will create more substantive engagement with your audiences to achieve social change outcomes.

 By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Select trends that are best suited for their program or organization.
  2. Develop an initial set of 1-3 ideas for how their program/organization can adopt the trends.
  3. Create a plan to research and test ideas to determine which ones are most realistic to achieve while also meeting consumer needs.
  4. Advocate internally for why ideas are critical for keeping programs relevant.

Your social change efforts are too important to get left behind, so let’s find ways to keep it interesting, engaging, and relevant.

WORKSHOP- The Power and Possibilities of Social Marketing: An Introduction

Speakers: Jennifer Lynes

Session Facilitators: Dr. Jennifer Lynes, Julie Cook

Session content overview:

This session will give participants an overview of the core elements and basic principles of social marketing. We will introduce the meaning, nature, and purpose of social marketing before reviewing a six-step process that will take participants from the beginning to the end stage of a typical social marketing program. The session will conclude with a discussion about challenges and opportunities to integrate social marketing programming into the workplace. The workshop will include case studies from around the world as well as interactive exercises.

Intended audience:

This session will be helpful to those who would like to understand more about the basic principles of social marketing and how to integrate them into program planning. No previous experience or knowledge is required. This session may also be helpful to those who already have a basic understanding of social marketing concepts but would like a refresher. Participants working in any field (e.g. health, sustainability, international development, finance, etc) are welcome.

Learning outcomes:

Participants will walk away from this workshop with:

  • An understanding of social marketing as a proven approach to behaviour change and social change more broadly
  • A skillset to use the six-step framework in the planning, implementation and evaluation of their social change programs
  • A range of ideas as to how to introduce the social marketing approach into social change programming in their field of work or workplace

2 October 2019

08:30 to 10:15 Opening Plenary

Speakers: Jennifer Lynes, Sandra Donatucci, Daniel Morier

Official Welcome and Opening Remarks

The conference will be officially opened by SMANA President, Sandra Paredes.

Keynote Presentations

  • Sandra Donatucci & Daniel Morier - Health Canada

Health Canada’s marketing team has been engaging with Canadians to improve their health since the 1970’s. Starting with health promotion as its core objective, Health Canada’s social marketing team uses a variety of traditional and modern tactics, innovative marketing approaches and partnerships with private and public organizations to reach Canadians of all ages, socioeconomic status and geographic locations. Some of the Department’s most recent social marketing work has included: Vaping and tobacco prevention campaigns, vaccination initiatives, Cannabis awareness campaigns. Sandra and Daniel will highlight how public opinion research has helped to inform much of Health Canada’s work and how a variety of marketing tactics have led to measured successes in recent years.

  

  • Dr. Jennifer Lynes - University of Waterloo

"Taking action on climate change: six things we need to get right"

The next generation of climate heroes is rising. This past year has seen unprecedented calls for climate change action from young people around the world. Successful social movements are organic, but they also need to have a coordinated approach, as protests and strikes from school will only get us so far.  Drawing from social marketing, green marketing and social change theory, this presentation looks at six things we need to get right if we are to harness the current calls to action to slow down the effects of climate change. 

    

10:15 to 10:45 Coffee Break
10:45 to 12:45 Morning Breakouts- Room 209

10:45- 11:30 Submission #50

Title: A Fireside Chat: Exploring the similarities and differences between social marketing, design thinking and behavioral economics


Track: Interdisciplinary and cross sector action to influence behaviour for social good

There are many behavior and social change disciplines, social marketing being one of them. Are you confused by all the different disciplines available to change agents? In this session we will unpack the similarities and differences between a couple of these disciplines.

Presenter: Kelley Dennings, Social Marketing Association of North America, United States, Jay Kassirer, Tools of Change | Cullbridge, Canada, Veronica Thomas, RTI, United States, Dr. Amanda Desnoyers, Government of Canada, Canada 

11:35- 11:55 Submission #30

Title: Using Nudging Techniques in Social Marketing to Decrease Cigarette Butt Littering

Track: Global climate change, environment protection, overconsumption and sustainability

I'll provide the summary in the next days as I'm travelling and between airports now! Sorry!

Presenter: Maximilian Witz, Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland, Natalie Rangelov. Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland

Author: Natalie Rangelov, Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland, L. Suzanne Suggs, Università della Svizzera italiana , Switzerland  

12:00- 12:20 Submission #37

Title: Encouraging Sustainable Forest Management in Baldwin, Maine

Track: Global climate change, environment protection, overconsumption and sustainability

Families and individuals own the largest portion of forestland in the U.S., which is critical for wildlife habitat, water quality, and sustainable wood supplies. This presentation will share findings from a social marketing project focused on changing attitudes and behaviors related to forest stewardship in a small community.

Presenter: Elizabeth Vranas, American Forest Foundation, United States 

Author: Elizabeth Vranas, American Forest Foundation, United States, Kelley Dennings, University of South Florida, United States  

12:25 - 12:45 Submission #17

Title: An innovative Web media for better communicating about climate change and pro-environmental actions: The case of “Unpointcinq”


Track: Global climate change, environment protection, overconsumption and sustainability

This study is part of a larger research project related to the recent creation of the first French Canadian Web media dedicated to promoting action to fight climate change: Unpointcinq. The general objective was to identify the priority segments to target, and the most efficient framing strategies to do so. Different frames were then tested in focus groups with the three principal segments identified through a large segmentation study.

Presenter: Pénélope Daignault, Laval University, Canada 

Author: Pénélope Daignault, Laval University, Canada, Valériane Champagne St-Arnaud, Laval University, Canada, Maxime Boivin, Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Canada   

10:45 to 12:45 Morning Breakouts- Room 210

10:45- 11:30 Submission #46

Title: Social Marketing for Community Health Transformation

Track: Creating and advocating for community-based social marketing programs

Explore the value of layering evidence-based interventions, food and physical environment enhancements, systems improvements and policy changes with strategic social marketing campaigns to successfully drive lifestyle behavior change among residents and accelerate a culture of health within a community.

Presenter: Rebecca Lindberg, Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, United States, Cindy Winters. Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, United States

Author: Rebecca Lindberg, Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, United States, Cindy Winters, Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, United States

11:35- 11:55 Submission #32

Title: Empowering Communities: How Washington State is confronting the opioid crisis with positive, pro-active messaging.


In this presentation, Michelle Hege, the CEO of DH, a communications agency located in Spokane, Washington, teams up with Washington State Health Care Authority to share strategies and lessons learned after two years of opioid social marketing campaigns.

Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

Like many states across the country, the State of Washington is working diligently to address the opioid crisis. Keeping our communities healthy and safe requires significant resources and human-power across public agencies and non-profit sectors. A huge part of this effort is a state-wide social marketing campaign.  In the face of an epidemic, this campaign takes a radical shift in perspective: an appeal to fear may will not change behavior. But the belief in the power and intention of our actions will.

In this presentation, Michelle Hege, the CEO of DH, a communications agency located in Spokane, Washington, teams up with Washington State Health Care Authority to share strategies and lessons learned after two years of opioid social marketing campaigns.

Presenter: Michelle Hege, DH, United States, Melissa Thoemke, Washington State Health Care Authority, United States

Author: Michelle Hege, DH, United States, Melissa Thoemke, Washington State Health Care Authority, United States     

12:00- 12:20 Submission #11

Title: Destigmatizing BC's Opioid Campaign


Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

Our objective was designed to destigmatize drug users and to raise empathy, awareness and involvement in the larger community. Our strategic and creative platform was designed to humanize drug users by placing their drug use within the larger, richer context of their lives and relationships.

Presenter: Jeff Lucas, Traction Creative, Canada  

Author: Jeff Lucas, Traction Creative, Canada, Regan Hansen, BC Ministry of Mental Health & Addictions, Canada  

12:25 - 12:45 Submission #16

Title: Formative research for anti-discrimination interventions aiming to arouse empathy: audience characteristics and PSA related features

Track: Interdisciplinary and cross sector action to influence behaviour for social good

Among intervention tools widely used to promote and to raise awareness of certain behaviors, public service announcements (PSAs) are a promising avenue for changing attitudes and behaviors and are often an integral part of larger interventions aimed at improving individual and collective well-being (Abroms & Maibach, 2008; Atkin & Rice, 2013; Vrij & Smith, 1999). In the context of anti-discrimination strategies, this type of advertising has the potential to induce empathic responses towards discriminated and marginalized groups (Donovan & Leivers, 1993; Pedersen, Beven, Walker, & Griffiths, 2004). To enhance the probability that an empathic reaction is induced, the development of the PSA messages needs to go through various stages, the first of which is the formative research stage where all the necessary information about the targeted audiences is collected (Atkin & Freimuth, 2013). Message tailoring and audience segmentation require a deeper knowledge of individual characteristics and message features and format that are likely to have an impact on triggering an empathic response. Our research aims to uncover which personal characteristics and message features are likely to have an effect on an empathic response in the context of anti-discrimination PSA reception.

Presenter: Isidora Janezic, Laval University, Canada 

Author: Isidora Janezic, Laval University, Canada     

10:45 to 12:45 Morning Breakouts- Room 211

10:45- 11:30 Submission #41

Title: Exploring Social Marketing Interventions in Tobacco Cessation


Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

Participants will gain insight into interventions undertaken within QuitNow, a BC tobacco cessation program. After a short introduction to the program, participants will select which intervention they would like to learn more about. Participants will be encouraged to move from one intervention to another in order to maximize their learning experience. 

Presenter: Suzanne Gaby, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Austen Erhardt. Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Sophie Fung, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada

Author: Suzanne Gaby, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Austen Erhardt, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Sophie Fung, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada 

11:35- 11:55 Submission #8

Title: Co-creation with consumers: a new approach of connected health promotion

Track: Using citizen focused design thinking, participative design, actor engagement and co-creation

Numerous health programs have tried to make people implement their diet to improve their health. These programs - mainly education and information-oriented - nevertheless sought to fight the epidemic of obesity and its potential outcomes on health disorders. We question how connected devices could provide a more effective method to promote healthy food in a social marketing perspective. Co-creation is a promising way to conceive new connected tools.

Presenter: Gurviez, AgroParisTech, France, Besson, Institut Mines-Telecom Business School, France

Author: Gurviez, AgroParisTech, France, Besson, Institut Mines-Telecom Business School, France  

12:00- 12:20 Submission #7



Title: Reaching Youth Through Innovative Social Marketing – Public Safety Canada's Don’t Drive High Campaign

Track: The application of new approaches and techniques in social marketing

Young people continue to be the largest group of drivers who die in crashes and later test positive for alcohol or drugs, and dangerous misconceptions about drugs and driving can be persistent and deeply entrenched.

“Don’t Drive High”, the Government of Canada’s national public awareness campaign targeting young people aged 16-24, launched in November 2017 with a 15-week multi-media advertising campaign. In this case study, we will look at how public opinion research helped to form strategy, how emerging trends like interactive technologies stacked up against traditional media tactics, and lessons learned on the path toward effecting long-term attitude and behaviour change.


Presenter: Kevin Miller, Government of Canada - Public Safety Canada, Canada, Renee Penning. Government of Canada - Public Safety Canada, Canada

Author: Kevin Miller, Government of Canada - Public Safety Canada, Canada, Renee Penning, Government of Canada - Public Safety Canada, Canada


12:25 - 12:45 Submission #40

Information to come. 


10:45 to 12:45 Morning Breakouts- Room 212

10:45- 11:05 SPECIAL PRESENTATION

Title: A Social Marketing Analysis of the Opioids Crisis

Description: Opioid misuse in the United States has created an epidemic, with over 60,000 fatalities per year from opioid overdoses. Addressing this challenge requires that programs not fall into the common pitfalls of drug prevention campaigns from previous eras, and instead apply current best practices to program research and design. This session will use Social Marketing principles to break down the opioid crisis to understand what would lead to measurable behavior change, and then reviews opioid misuse prevention programs from Vermont and Illinois. Audience segmentation, message development and tailoring, and considerations from the 4Ps will all be discussed.



Presenter: Jeff Jordan, Rescue Agency, United States

  

11:10- 11:30 Submission #19

Title: Using peer crowd segmentation research to address young adult heavy drinking and tobacco use


Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

Formative research was conducted in Eastern Ontario and Hamilton, Ontario to identify high-risk peer crowds for tailored interventions for young adult heavy drinking and tobacco use. Young adult heavy drinking was disproportionately high among the Partier psychographic peer crowd, while tobacco use was disproportionately high among the Outdoors peer crowd.

Presenter: Katie McCabe, Rescue Agency, USA 

Author: Katie McCabe, Rescue Agency, USA   

11:35- 11:55 SPECIAL PRESENTATION

Title: How to Make Sense of it All: Turning Technical Jargon into Action


Working largely in the transportation, infrastructure and public health sectors, we often need to find ways to communicate and promote engagement on complex topics that impact the day-to-day lives of the public. In this session we will unpack our strategies to effectively engage people on complex topics.

Presenter: Suzanne Gaby, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Austen Erhardt, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Sophie Fung, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada

Author: Suzanne Gaby, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Austen Erhardt, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Sophie Fung, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada 

12:00- 12:20 Submission #55

Title: The power of the collective – generating stakeholder solutions


Track: The application of new approaches and techniques in social marketing

The need for wider inclusion of stakeholders to overcome complex challenges is noted. A Creating Collective Solutions workshop was implemented to design strategies to reduce agricultural run-off and improve water quality with diverse range of stakeholders. Responding to the need to take a wide systems’ approach this paper advances knowledge in the social marketing discipline.

Presenter: Carina Roemer, Social Marketing @ Griffith, Australia, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Social Marketing @ Griffith, Australia

Author: Carina Roemer, Social Marketing @ Griffith, Australia   

12:25 - 12:45 Submission #24

Title: Promoting fall prevention workshops for individuals aged 60 and over: an exploratory study taking a social marketing approach

Track: Creating and advocating for community-based social marketing programs

This session presents results from a qualitative study targeting people aged 60 and over who had refused to participate in fall prevention workshops. The study explore the different representations of physical activity (PA); the obstacles and facilitators to recommencing PA, as well as the socio-environmental context. The general aim of our project is to experiment the social marketing method to promote fall prevention workshops for the elderly.

Presenter: GOETHALS Luc, Jean Monnet University, France 

Author: GOETHALS Luc, Jean Monnet University, France, BARTH Nathalie, Jean Monnet University, France, PEUVERGNE Marina, Lumière Lyon 2 University, France, GALLOPEL-MORVAN Karine, EHESP School of Public Health, France, BONGUE Bienvenu, Jean Monnet University, France 

10:45 to 12:45 Morning Breakouts- Room 214

10:45- 11:45 Special Presentation

 The first presentation in the main plenary room will be a special presentation. Details will be released closer to the event. 

11:50- 12:10 Submission #43

Title: “That’s Messed Up” – Youth Perceptions of SSB Marketing and Suggestions for Countermarketing


Track: Creating and advocating for community-based social marketing programs

This presentation will discuss formative qualitative research leading to a campaign to reduce sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption among low-income youth in the Bronx, NY. The discussion will feature message frames found to be most effective in convincing youth to give up sugary drinks in favor of consuming more water.

Presenter: P. Christopher Palmedo, PhD, MBA, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, USA 

Author: P. Christopher Palmedo, PhD, MBA, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, USA   

12:15-12:35 Submission #26

Title: Understanding the Cultural Trends of Youth Vaping


Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

While research on youth vaping patterns is still limited, evidence is emerging that indicates the newest wave of youth vaping is being driven by a subculture that is traditionally at low to moderate risk for combustable tobacco use. This presentation will discuss current youth vaping patterns and provide insights about the subculture that appears to be at higher risk for vaping. By knowing which youth subculture(s) are at greatest risk, public health organizations can develop stronger interventions that appeal to the audience and include messages that align with their values.

Presenter: Tyler Janzen, Rescue Agency, Canada, Jeff Jordan. Rescue Agency, United States

Author: Tyler Janzen, Rescue Agency, Canada

12:45 to 13:45 Lunch
13:45 to 16:10 Afternoon Breakouts- Room 209

1:45- 2:30 Submission #49

Title: Changing food systems: The intersection between individuals and collective action for impact

Track: Interdisciplinary and cross sector action to influence behaviour for social good

In order to avoid the worst effects of climate change, we need to reduce meat and dairy consumption. Although plant-based options are gaining popularity, cultural norms and policies continue to favor animal agriculture. Individual action can play an important role in helping change norms, shift markets, and drive political change.

Presenter: Stephanie Feldstein, Center for Biological Diversity, United States, Erin Biehl. Center for a Livable Future, United States, Lasse Bruun, 40by50,

 

2:35- 2:55 Submission #3

Title: Evaluating the State of Cyberbullying Research and the Effectiveness of
Anti-Cyberbullying Campaigns


Track: Assessing, implementing and understanding the use of digital

Cyberbullying is recognized by many – including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, and The White House – to be a serious public health problem. Cyberbullying often occurs when an individual, or group of individuals, target a person online to initiate bullying. Its effects range from depression, anxiety, isolation, physical health issues, and lower academic scores, all of which can persist from childhood into adulthood. In addition, cyberbullying has been linked to a great number of suicide cases in young people. The MITRE team undertook exploratory research and analysis of the cyberbullying issue through a literature review and social media analysis.

Presenter: Dawn Stapleton, MITRE, USA 

Author: Dawn Stapleton, MITRE, USA, Alison Dingwall, MPH, PhD, MITRE, USA, Ryan Hollins, MITRE, USA, Kristen Klein, PhD, MITRE, USA, Jennifer Mathieu, PhD, MITRE, USA, Lee Stein, MITRE, USA, Jenn Tung Galent, MS, MITRE, USA

3:00- 3:20 Submission #25

Title: Protective effects in the emerging vape trend: An evaluation of the UPRISE social
marketing campaign in Ontario

Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

The evaluation of a youth tobacco prevention campaign for the higher-risk Alternative peer crowd in Ontario demonstrates the campaign reached and appealed to its target audience, and may have positively affected behaviour including protecting Alternative teens from the broader trend of increasing vape use.

Presenter: Tyler Janzen, Rescue Agency, Canada, Heather McCully, City of Hamilton Public Services, Canada

Author: Carolyn Stalgaitis, Rescue Agency, United States, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Social Marketing @ Griffith, Australia

3:25- 4:10 Special Presentation

Title: Serving Underserved Populations: A Northern Experience

Working in the north presents wonderful opportunities and experiences, as well as unique challenges. This session will review challenges and missteps made by practitioners when working in the north. Successful practices taken to address these common pitfalls will then be reviewed - what we have done and how we evaluated their success - followed by a discussion of lessons learned through working in the north.

Presenters: Maxine Agnoo, ChangeMakers: An Argyle Company, Canada, Suzanne Gaby, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Jill McLean, ChangeMakers: An Argyle Company, Canada

13:45 to 16:00 Afternoon Breakouts- Room 210

1:45- 2:30 Submission #48

Title: Selecting and unpacking behaviours: A critical first step in developing effective behavioural change programs


Track: Creating and advocating for community-based social marketing programs

The first step of community-based social marketing is behaviour selection. This interactive session will cover how to select which behaviors to target as well as how to “unpack” selected behaviours. Determining which behaviours to target, and developing a deep understanding of the selected behaviours, is a critical first step in delivering effective social marketing programs.

Presenter: Doug McKenzie-Mohr, McKenzie-Mohr & Associates, Canada 

Author: Doug McKenzie-Mohr, McKenzie-Mohr & Associates, Canada   

2:35- 2:55 Submission #36

Title: Exploring how community-based social marketing is applied in practice;  five Canadian case studies



Track: Creating and advocating for community-based social marketing programs

Community-based social marketing (CBSM) offers a pragmatic five-step approach to fostering sustainable behaviour. However, little is known about how communities actually put the principles of CBSM into practice.  This presentation focuses on five Canadian residential water-efficiency programs that  used CBSM principles and explores to what extent the various parts of the framework were put into action. 

Presenter: Jennifer Lynes, University of Waterloo, Canada, Julie Cook. University of Waterloo, Canada

Author: Sarah Fries, University of Waterloo, Canada, Julie Cook, University of Waterloo, Canada, Jennifer Lynes, University of Waterloo, Canada 

3:00- 4:00 Submission #38

Title: Advancing social marketing: putting theory into practice


Track: The application of new approaches and techniques in social marketing

The discipline of social marketing has evolved significantly since first conception moving from a promotional focus, to having behavioural change as an end goal. In order to achieve change we need to understand what influences behaviour change.  In short, we know who changes, when they change and why.  Theory is useful for practitioners and researchers, as it can provide a guiding framework. Many of the theories used in social marketing are drawn from other disciplines, e.g. psychology and a consequence of this is our focus is currently centred on understanding how people think and currently behave.  Less emphasis is placed on understanding behavioural change.  Reviews of social marketing studies and programs show poor theory application, which is further limiting our understanding about what works and where. We propose a panel presentation.  This will be an interactive session where participants will receive hands on learning tasks. We will start by outlining social marketing’s theory development goals (SMTDG) and we will share progress on Goals No. 3, No. 8, and No. 10, allowing time for discussion and active learning.

Presenter: Patricia David, Social Marketing @ Griffith, Griffith University, Australia, Bo Pang. Social Marketing @ Griffith, Griffith University, Australia, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Social Marketing @ Griffith, Griffith University, Australia

13:45 to 16:10 Afternoon Breakouts- Room 211

1:45- 2:05 Submission #52

Title: Repurposing Pro-Ana/Mia Social Media’s “Uses and Gratifications” to Enhance Pro-Recovery Campaigns

Track: Assessing, implementing and understanding the use of digital

Drawing on Uses and Gratifications Theory, our research strives to isolate the gratifications vulnerable individuals receive from accessing pro-anorexia/bulimia social media content from this material’s triggering aesthetics. We hope these findings can not only support the development of pro-eating disorder recovery campaigns, but also contribute to broader conversations about using social media as a resource for social marketing strategies.

Presenter: Amanda K. Greene, PhD, Lehigh University, USA, Lisa M. Brownstone, PhD. University of Denver, USA

Author: Amanda K. Greene, PhD, Lehigh University, USA, Lisa M. Brownstone, PhD, University of Denver, USA  

2:10- 2:30 Submission #22

Title: Creating effective cannabis prevention messaging: Motivations and psychographic predictors of cannabis use among underage youth in the western United States

Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

Research was conducted to identify which teen peer crowds are at greatest risk for cannabis use and to understand their motivations for use. Peer crowd identification was associated with unique patterns of values and beliefs that may provide insight into how crowd identification shapes behavior, and the types of cannabis prevention messages likely to resonate with at-risk teens.

Presenter: Katie McCabe, Rescue Agency, USA 

Author: Katie McCabe, Rescue Agency, USA     

 

 

 

2:35- 2:55 Submission #9

Title:  Indigenous Strengths Cannabis Campaign

Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

The campaign leverages Indigenous strengths and values to engage and empower youth to make informed choices. The campaign encourages safe choices while promoting personal and cultural pride.  The wellness-centered campaign targets youth and uses digital ads across 6 web and social media platforms to encourage learning about the health impacts of cannabis at the microsite www.fnha.ca/cannabis.

Presenter: Jeff Lucas, Traction Creative, Canada, Davis McKenzie. First Nations Health Authority, Canada

Author: Jeff Lucas, Traction Creative, Canada, Davis McKenzie, First Nations Health Authority, Canada

 

 

3:00- 3:20 Submission #12

Title: Preventing Youth from Driving High

Track: Reducing the impact of addiction including substance misuse, alcohol, tobacco and gambling

Social marketing campaigns aimed at preventing youth from driving under the influence of marijuana are identified. Campaign effectiveness is analyzed based on adherence to theoretical frameworks. Recommendations on how to improve future social marketing initiatives are discussed.

Presenter: Jessica Davis, Saskatchewan Government Insurance, Canada, Dr. Magdalena Cismaru. University of Regina, Canada

Author: Jessica Davis, Saskatchewan Government Insurance, Canada, Dr. Magdalena Cismaru, University of Regina, Canada      

3:25- 3:45 Submission #4

Title: Terminology and Constructs of Financial Distress: A Conceptual and Operational Review`

Track: Interdisciplinary and cross sector action to influence behaviour for social good

Financial distress is a timely and important issue studied interdisciplinary. However, transferability of knowledge inside the same disciplines, across disciplines, and to practitioners is limited by inexistent or inconsistent terms. This paper aims to increase understanding of the relation between financial terms, and offers recommendations for researchers and collaborators.

Presenter: Amanda Wuth, Psychology Department, University of Regina, Canada, Magdalena Cismaru, Hill/Levene Schools of Business, University of Regina, Canada

Author: Amanda Wuth, Psychology Department, University of Regina, Canada, Magdalena Cismaru, Hill/Levene Schools of Business, University of Regina, Canada    

3:50- 4:10 Submission #20

Title: Using Social Marketing to Develop Innovative Digital Products to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes.

Track: Assessing, implementing and understanding the use of digital

This presentation will describe the process for developing highly interactive digital modules intended to motivate participant retention in CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program.  Modules reinforced curriculum content and offered motivational messaging and tips to encourage participants to continue the program. We will showcase sample modules and discuss lessons learned.

Presenter: Trish Taylor, PhD, Hager Sharp, USA 

Author: Trish Taylor, PhD, Hager Sharp, USA, Lauren Salay, Hager Sharp, USA, Michelle Owens-Gary, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA, Jude McDivitt, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA, Nancy Silver, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

13:45 to 16:10 Afternoon Breakouts- Room 212

1:45- 2:05 Submission #45

Title: Using Digital Media to Capture Attention and Change Behaviour in Metro Vancouver

Track: Assessing, implementing and understanding the use of digital

Metro Vancouver runs 10+ behaviour change campaigns a year, and competition for the audience’s attention is fierce. Digital media tactics capture attention by getting the right message to the right audience at the right time. This presentation will explore how Metro Vancouver uses digital media in behaviour change campaigns.

Presenter: Alison Schatz, Metro Vancouver, Canada 

Author: Alison Schatz, Metro Vancouver, Canada     

2:10- 2:30 Submission #31

Title: How to Make Sense of it All: Turning Technical Jargon into Action

Track: Global climate change, environment protection, overconsumption and sustainability

Working largely in the transportation, infrastructure and public health sectors, we often need to find ways to communicate and promote engagement on complex topics that impact the day-to-day lives of the public. In this session we will unpack our strategies to effectively engage people on complex topics.
Case studies include a mobility pricing education and engagement campaign, and communicating the physiological effects of alcohol to populations in Canada’s north.

Presenter: Suzanne Gaby, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Austen Erhardt. Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Sophie Fung, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada

Author: Suzanne Gaby, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Austen Erhardt, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada, Sophie Fung, Context: An Argyle Company, Canada 

2:35- 2:55 Submission #35

Title: Using Homeowners’ Association Membership to Define Audience Segments: Implications for Targeted Local Social Marketing Interventions From a Statewide Study

Track: Global climate change, environment protection, overconsumption and sustainability

Descriptive norms from four referent groups were added to the Theory of Planned Behavior to examine landscape water conservation behaviours in Florida’s homeowners’ association communities. Findings illuminate possible paths to behaviour change and provide practical guidance for social marketing programs targeting this rapidly-growing potential audience segment.

Presenter: Laura A. Warner, University of Florida, USA 

Author: Laura A. Warner, University of Florida, USA     

3:00- 3:20 Submission #27

Title: The effects of branding on physical activity correlates and behaviour: A systematic review

Track: The application of new approaches and techniques in social marketing

The purpose of this systematic review was to learn whether brand equity variables are associated with physical activity (PA) and correlates of PA. In general, certain brand equity variables (e.g., brand awareness) do seem to be associated with moderate or vigorous PA and several key correlates (e.g., PA attitude).

Presenter: Alexander Lithopoulos, University of Victoria, Canada 

Author: Alexander Lithopoulos, University of Victoria, Canada, Ryan E. Rhodes, University of Victoria, Canada    

3:25- 3:45 Submission #54

Title: You Want Us to Do WHAT? When the Behaviour is a Big Ask

Track: Global climate change, environment protection, overconsumption and sustainability

When the wanted behaviour is arduous, add some extra steps to traditional community-based social marketing. These extra steps create buy-in – this is what you need for this kind of a commitment. Some of the steps are counter-intuitive – like charging them for the privilege. Spoiler alert: creating community is key.

Presenter: Susan Bryan, Washtenaw County Water Resources, USA 

Author: Susan Bryan, Washtenaw County Water Resources, USA     

3:50- 4:10 Submission #51

Title: Using design thinking for organizational intersectional work: An upstream target audience of environmental organization leaders

Track: Using citizen focused design thinking, participative design, actor engagement and co-creation

Human population growth and consumption can be tied to our most pressing environmental challenges like climate change and loss of biodiversity. The Center for Biological Diversity held a design thinking session to approach these topics through a creative, solutions-oriented perspective, generating new ideas for meaningful action with the goal to increase other environmental group’s engagement in the nexus of reproductive health, consumption and environmental degradation.

Presenter: Kelley Dennings, Center for Biological Diversity, United States 

Author: Kelley Dennings, Center for Biological Diversity, United States     

13:45 to 15:55 Afternoon Breakouts- Room 214

1:45- 2:45 Evaluation & Design Thinking Panel

This session will look at how design thinking can be used in social marketing interventions, including how it can be incorporated into the evaluation of a program. 

2:50- 3:55 Rethinking Transportation in North America: Encouraging Healthy, Safe and Sustainable Travel

North America has embraced the car as the primary transportation mode, despite the negative effects this has on our personal health, the strength of our communities and the state of our global climate. This has resulted in cities that are built for cars, rather than people, where individuals feel unsafe to cycle, and sometimes even walk. This panel brings together experts working at different levels to change the infrastructure and culture around transportation in North America, with an emphasis on safety.

16:15 to 17:00 Closing Plenary

Speakers: Jeff Jordan

Keynote Presentation

  • Jeff Jordan - Rescue

"Opioids, Vaping & Marijuana: Finding the Pathway to Change for New Challenges"

Social Marketers face new challenges regularly and it is our job to find the right strategy for each challenge. But how do we quickly assess the options available to us when faced with an urgent new challenge like opioids, teen vaping, or legalized marijuana? We must first understand the factors that are leading to the undesired behaviours to identify which offers the best opportunity to drive change. This talk will explore the pathways to behaviour change for different behaviours and help Social Marketers avoid applying the same strategy to distinct problems. 

18:00 to 19:15 Networking Drinks

Event Sponsors 


Event Supporters

Back to top